What’s Your Thinking Style

What’s Your Thinking Style

What’s your thinking style? Just like we have personality preferences for introversion and extroversion, we also have preferred ways of thinking about problems. Typically, we handle problems in a tried and true way that we’re comfortable with. We don’t even know we have a thinking style because it’s just who we are, yet we do have different ways of thinking. In fact, we may have six or seven different styles of seeking a decision. Understanding how you think and how your teammates think could be essential for groups who must work together effectively. When you consider successful teams–though they are measured by what they produce–they function better when they have diverse thinking styles. Research shows that it is ultimately how teams think together that most determines their performance. Instead of assigning groups based on personality traits, skills and strengths, managers might want to evaluate how potential members think. What Is a Thinking Style? According to Pearson Assessments, thinking styles are positive habits that contribute to better critical thinking, problem-solving and decision-making. While no one thinking style is better than another, a balance of the various types results in better decision-making. Their online self-assessment measures how individuals use seven different approaches to thinking: Analytical: clear thinking, orderly and rational Inquisitive: curious, alert and interested in the surrounding world Insightful: prudent, humble, reflective and strategic Open-minded: intellectually tolerant and fair-minded Systematic: conceptual, process-oriented and intuitive Timely: efficient, reliable and responsive Truth-seeking: independent, tough-minded and skeptical ThinkWatson has a self-assessment you can take for free. Knowing your preferred style will help you approach problems and decisions with the right mindset. Which of...
A Brief History of Organizations: The Quest to Reinvent Work

A Brief History of Organizations: The Quest to Reinvent Work

The way we work isn’t working anymore. Some experts blame traditional organizational hierarchies, incentives that fail to motivate, disengaged employees (two-thirds of the workforce), and a system that overcompensates management while undervaluing frontline workers. New ways of working have already evolved, explains corporate coach Frederic Laloux in Reinventing Organizations: A Guide to Creating Organizations Inspired by the Next Stage of Human Consciousness. He poses an important question: Can we create organizations free of politics, bureaucracy and infighting; free of stress and burnout; free of resignation, resentment, and apathy; and free of the posturing at the top and the drudgery at the bottom? Some say we’re on the verge of a shift in the way we organize and manage people who must work together. Others aren’t so sure. Is it really possible to reinvent organizations? Can we devise a new model that makes work more productive—and, even more importantly—truly fulfilling and meaningful? In the course of history, humankind has repeatedly reinvented how people come together to get work done, each time creating a new, vastly superior organizational model. What’s more, this historical perspective hints at a new organizational design that may be just around the corner, waiting to emerge. Organizations’ Evolving Stages A review of the major stages in the development of human consciousness and organizations reveals how we can potentially reinvent work to be more productive and meaningful. Many scientists and historians have categorized how we organize to get things done, but naming the stages is always a struggle. It’s challenging to use a single adjective to capture the complex reality of any organizational model. One way to understand...